The Question: Easter Brunch or Dinner?

I've been trying to convince my friend Kostas (born and raised mostly in Greece) that many Americans celebrate Easter in similar fashion; church, followed by brunch, and perhaps then a festive event such as an Easter egg hunt.

He argued that in Greece, Easter dinner is the norm - sans our added commercial elements of Easter egg hunts, bunnies, and pastel colors. This entire discussion was prompted by me trying to organize a gathering of friends for an Easter celebration, which in turn led to the discussion of which is better - Easter brunch or dinner? I am now curious to hear what others consider "the norm," for this holiday - if there is in fact a norm.

Long story short, I conceded and my friends and I are now planning what to bring for our "Cathodox" Easter dinner (a combination of Catholic and Greek Orthodox which sums up the majority of our friends). Though I still side with brunch being better, I've decided to bring an arrangement similar to this, so at least my Easter traditions will be represented - pale pink and bunnies all the way!

image/epicurious

7 comments

MAHOLLA! said...

Brunch Baby!

Carol said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Carol said...

We have always done Church then a big dinner. But I do agree that brunch is more common in America! I love Easter dinner with my family, but when I have my own family, I want to do a full Martha Stewart brunch!

Jody said...

brunch all the way. I have never heard of Easter dinner until this whole incidence. Who knew?!

expat extraordinare said...

Not sure, we dont do Easter...I fell like I'm missing out!

Carla said...

dinner for my family! I guess I'm one of the weird ones and never knew. :) However, there was never a lack of the "egg" theme: easter egg hunts, dyeing eggs in an array of bright colors, and the giant bordeaux eggs from See's. Can't wait for our little shindig!

a cat of impossible colour said...

We always went to church and then had a big lunch - usually of roast lamb, because of the religious symbolism. That was in England and Zimbabwe, which has a very British culture. But brunch is a fabulous idea.