Foodie Roundup

Is it just me, or are the summer recipes just bursting through your feed as well?  I've been pinning recipe after recipe, mouth watering in eager anticipation of all these tasty treats we will (hopefully, ideally, perhaps...) make someday soon.

{savory}




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Happy Mother's Day

Happy Mother's Day!  Wishing love and happiness to all the mamas out there.  My heart is full of gratitude as I celebrate my fourth Mother's Day this year, and was awoken to the sweet scent of pancakes, a card bearing by my children's names in my daughter's penmanship, and a bouquet of  flowers.  I love my children fiercely, and though they sure wear me out by bed time, I couldn't imagine life any other way.  

Also sending a heartfelt prayer to all of those women dreaming and wishing to be mothers, who may not have gotten the opportunity yet for a number of reasons.  Today, I am thinking of you today, and praying for you. 

In the event that you have a little extra time to peruse links on your special day, here's a roundup of a few that intrigued me this week.

+ this episode of Radio Lab (it's old, yes, but very interesting about the challenges some same-sex couples face internationally related to surrogacy)

+ watched The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks on HBO this week. I read the book years ago, but this gave some perspective to the character of Deborah Lacks (Henrietta's youngest daughter).  Oprah is powerful and captivating as Deborah, you truly forget that she's Oprah!

+ this sweet, reaffirming post on aging 

+ salivating over these antipasto skewers, summer picnics are in sight!

+ eager to read this new parenting book

+ loving this post on finding the balance between being motherhood and everything else

+ interesting read, "our mothers as we never saw them"

image/designmom

Lovely Little Reads: Not Quite Narwhal

Books are my love language.  Have I told you that?  I love a good book; whether that be a high-school-English classic or a children's picture book or a smutty chic-lit read, there is something about engaging and getting sucked into a good book.

I've been a bit behind posting our latest favorites in children's literature to the blog, but I'm quite active over on instagram if you'd like to follow along.

Not Quite Narwhal caught my eye because my kids are obsessed with narwhals.  Fun fact, my husband - the engineer, mind you - wasn't sure narwhals were real things.  He thought they were up there with unicorns and hippogriffs.  Yep, honey.  They're real whales.  

Anyway, Young Kelp was born in the sea, but as a helmet-clad unicorn, grew up believing he was just an unusual narwhal.  He recognized that was he was different growing up; tastes in food, speed of swimming, you know, the basics, but never really understood why.  Until one day, he catches a glimpse of a unicorn's silhouette on the horizon at dusk and is enchanted.  Could it be?  Another creature just like Kelp?  His first experience on land, he must teach himself to walk, and discovers that there is a much bigger world than what he's known in the sea.  A sweet story about finding your footing, learning you you really are and where you want to be.

For more of our favorite reads, follow along on instagram!

Anne of Green Gables

Have you heard?  A remake of Anne of Green Gables will be available this month on Netflix!  I read and loved the first few books as a kid, but wasn't a huge fan of adapted movie or TV mini series.  Hence, I am excited to see if this does the books justice!  Here's a preview, the trailer looks promising and the setting verdant and wild.
What do you think?  Will you watch?


This post is part of my partnership with Netflix where I share what my family and I are watching each month on our favorite streaming platform. All thoughts and opinions are my own.  #StreamTeam

Fun Find

I loved flower pressing as a kid.  I'm not even sure why exactly, it's not a very fruitful hobby.  I remember picking blooms off my mom's potted pansies without her approval and then carefully pressing them between two sheets of cardboard.  My press always felt "fancy" to me, as there were several screws you cranked to ensure the press was successful. When I saw these glasses over at Cupcakes and Cashmere and a wave of nostalgia for those lazy summer days, picking and pressing flowers which later ended up glued onto birthday cards for grandparents.  

Anyone else press flowers as a kid?  I think I might buy these glasses solely to indulge in that sweet memory.

image/urbanoutfitters

April Favorites (a few days late)

Native deodorant (paraben and aluminum free) - by far the best natural deodorant I've tried, clean, fresh scents, and comes in the traditional stick form

+ the show Life in Pieces on Netflix

+ the Moana soundtrack (of the childrens tunes we own, this album hasn't driven me crazy yet, I attribute to the fun, catchy beats)

+ two young adult novels by Jennifer Niven, All The Bright Places and Holding Up the Universe, both are intense and heart wrenching at times, but I couldn't put them down

+ this delicious recipe for everything Greek pork pitas

+ this post about teaching children consent (especially #2, "don't pout" which I think is something my parents' generation does all the time and until now, I never realized this could be teaching kids to feel guilty in relation to consent)

+ this post makes me want to get back to Croatia

image/pinterest

13 Reasons Why

Have you read 13 Reasons Why?  No?  Okay... Have you seen 13 Reasons Why?  Let me elaborate.

13 Reasons Why is the story of Hannah Baker, a seventeen year old high school junior whose seemingly abrupt suicide sends shockwaves through her small town.  The news of Hannah's suicide is compounded when weeks later, a mysterious unmarked box is dropped on the porch of Clay Jenson, Hannah's former classmate, co-worker, and onetime crush.  Curious, Clay opens it to discover seven cassette tapes, unmarked other than the numbers 1 through 13, painted on in blue nail polish.  After struggling to find a device that can actually play tapes, Clay's blood runs cold as he plays tape #1 only to hear the familiar voice of Hannah Baker, detailing the circumstances that led her to take her own life.  She goes on to explain the chain of events that contributed to her ultimate decision, and if you're hearing these tapes, that you were in fact one of the thirteen reasons why.

This month, 13 Reasons Why the series debuted on Netflix.  Both the book, by Jay Asher, and show are haunting, intense, and thought provoking.  There are distinct plot difference, though the underlying current and tone is the same.  I did appreciate the character development the show portrayed that was not always apparent in the book; the depths of physical anguish and sadness carried by Hannah's grieving parents, the quiet ache felt by those who used to consider Hannah a friend.  The throbbing pain of her absence in everything at school; her abandoned locker, the perpetually empty seat in her classes, the shrine of flowers and pictures in the front hall.

What 13 Reasons Why highlights is that sometimes something that seems so insignificant to one person might consume another. An empty rumor that spiraled out of control, being branded a slut when there's no validity to the claim, the out-of-context photo that went viral, and the vague plea for help that went ignored.  When these incidents are stacked one atop the other, it can feel overwhelming.  Which is why it is imperative to reach out, know the signs, ask and offer help.  Every gesture counts.

My only experience with suicide comes from high school.  My sophomore year, one of my closest friends attempted suicide.  She had a huge fight with her mom before school, and downed a bottle of her brother's heart medication and then came to school as usual.  We had first period together.  We used to share clothes and that morning I was wearing her sweater.  When I motioned to it as I walked past her assigned seat up the aisle to my own, I remember her blank eyes, staring straight ahead.  About five minutes into class, the guidance counselor rushed in, exchanged hushed whispers with the teacher, and ushered my friend out of the room.  I didn't see her the rest of the day. She didn't come back to school that entire week.

This was before everyone had cell phones, so we couldn't call or text from school to check in, and our calls to her home phone went unanswered.  Later, a rumor circulated that an ambulance had been at school that same day.  I never even thought to connect the two occurrences.  I was one of her closest friends, and I had no idea anything was amiss.  In hindsight, I realize that there were red flags, behaviors that could be characterized as a cry for help.  But then, in my high school bubble; to me she was popular.  She was adored.  She was happy.  Until I knew the truth, I had no idea.

So there, these are my reasons why 13 Reasons Why is worth a watch.  The show is visceral.  It is heartbreaking to watch at times.  It is quite difficult to watch at times.  However, I think it also has the potential to open up a dialogue about a challenging subject between parents and their teens.

This post is part of my partnership with Netflix where I share what my family and I are watching each month on our favorite streaming platform. All thoughts and opinions are my own.  #StreamTeam